Federal research shows people are driving more --  the average miles driven per year is on the rise --  and more motorists on the road means more accidents. The cost to repair newer model cars with high-tech safety devices and sensor technology is also increasing, as are medical costs for injuries. And don’t forget about the hurricane and hail damage from recent severe weather storms. Insurers are passing on some of these higher expenses to you in the form of higher car insurance rates to recoup their losses.
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The first part of the post only outlines the financial and other consequences that will be imposed on you by the State of Texas for driving without insurance. What has not been mentioned is the devastating costs you will face if you get into an accident that is your fault. In Texas, you can be held 100 percent liable for any and all physical injuries and property damage resulting from a vehicle accident that you have caused. Think of what those costs could be: thousands, hundreds of thousands, maybe more.

Texas, like other states, requires all drivers to carry a stated minimum of liability coverage ($25,000 for property damage, $30,000 per person/$60,000 per accident for personal injury). And although most drivers in Texas comply with the law and carry at least these legal minimums, many do not. Some estimates put the percentage of uninsured drivers in Texas at between 20 and 25 percent. Here is what will happen if you are caught as a member of that group:
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