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In western states, Grange Insurance Association (not to be confused with Grange Insurance) typically offered some of the cheapest car insurance policies to young drivers. Grange operates in California, Idaho, Wyoming, Colorado, Washington and Oregon. In Oregon, young driver rates from Grange were about 75% less expensive than the state average. For those looking for car insurance in California, GEICO is also another cheap alternative.
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The first time you get caught driving without valid insurance in Texas, you will probably get off pretty lightly, at least compared with other states. That is, of course, if you consider the following getting off lightly. First-time offenders will, by law, be cited and fined between $175 and $350. Additionally, a surcharge of $250 will be added to your annual driver’s license fee for each of the next three years. Added up, getting caught driving without insurance in Texas the first time will end up costing you between $925 and $1100.
The first part of the post only outlines the financial and other consequences that will be imposed on you by the State of Texas for driving without insurance. What has not been mentioned is the devastating costs you will face if you get into an accident that is your fault. In Texas, you can be held 100 percent liable for any and all physical injuries and property damage resulting from a vehicle accident that you have caused. Think of what those costs could be: thousands, hundreds of thousands, maybe more.

We fooled you, as chances are you thought we’d list the “good student discount,” which usually gives up to 15 percent off for those who maintain a “B” average, but most folks are aware of that. While it’s a bonus that’s good to get, and one we recommend you look into, you can likely save way more by simply doing a car insurance comparison to see who offers the lowest rates. Here’s why: Rates for the exact same coverage vary by hundreds of dollars, depending on which insurer you choose. That’s because each insurance company assesses risk differently and uses its own formula when deciding how much you pay. If you don’t shop around, you won’t save. You can see how much you can save by using our average car insurance rates tool, which shows rates by ZIP code for six age groups and three coverage levels, as well as the highest and  lowest rates fielded from up to six major insurers.
Texas, like other states, requires all drivers to carry a stated minimum of liability coverage ($25,000 for property damage, $30,000 per person/$60,000 per accident for personal injury). And although most drivers in Texas comply with the law and carry at least these legal minimums, many do not. Some estimates put the percentage of uninsured drivers in Texas at between 20 and 25 percent. Here is what will happen if you are caught as a member of that group:
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