Another significant way to reduce costs is by omitting coverages that may be unnecessary and expensive for teen drivers—such as collision insurance. Collision insurance is costly for teen drivers. This is because these demographics are statistically more likely to get into an accident and file an insurance claim than more experienced drivers. If your car is worth less than a few thousand dollars, getting collision coverage will not be worth the increase in premiums, and we recommend opting for basic coverage instead.
Unfortunately, young drivers pay more for car insurance because you have limited driving experience. Although car insurance rates are highest for teenagers, young adult drivers often pay more for insurance until they are 25 or 26—or even up to 30. The only way to know which insurance companies are best for young adults is to compare competing quotes from a handful of auto insurance companies—every car insurance company prices their policies differently.
We acquired quotes from over 103 companies in 200 cities across the U.S. for a sample 17-year-old male driver who drives a 2011 Toyota Camry. We specified that he previously did not have insurance and was opting for full coverage (see limits below). We included the top 15 cheapest companies that were also available in at least 15 cities nationwide. For adding onto a parent's policy, we assumed the parent was a 45-year-old male, married, with no previous accidents or incidents in his driving record.

Recently, Honda Civic designers have focused on safety, adding a reverse camera to all vehicles. In addition, the Civic features electronic stability control, anti-lock brakes, daytime running lights, side airbags, front and rear head curtain airbags and front seat-mounted torso airbags. Winning top marks in all IIHS safety categories since 2006, the latest models incorporate hands-free Bluetooth phone connection and digital dashboard control, which is sure to appeal to teens seeking a modern feel. Only hybrid versions have front crash prevention.
The first part of the post only outlines the financial and other consequences that will be imposed on you by the State of Texas for driving without insurance. What has not been mentioned is the devastating costs you will face if you get into an accident that is your fault. In Texas, you can be held 100 percent liable for any and all physical injuries and property damage resulting from a vehicle accident that you have caused. Think of what those costs could be: thousands, hundreds of thousands, maybe more.
Insurance terms, definitions and explanations are intended for informational purposes only and do not in any way replace or modify the definitions and information contained in individual insurance contracts, policies or declaration pages, which control coverage determinations. Such terms may vary by state, and exclusions may apply. Discounts may not be applied to all policy coverages.
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Terrific fuel economy might draw parents to this mid-size sedan, which has tons of safety features, including stability and traction control, integrated blind spot mirrors and optional lane departure warning. The optional MyKey feature limits top speed to 80 mph and radio volume to 45 percent, which can help parents breathe a little easier when teens gets behind the wheel.

The first time you get caught driving without valid insurance in Texas, you will probably get off pretty lightly, at least compared with other states. That is, of course, if you consider the following getting off lightly. First-time offenders will, by law, be cited and fined between $175 and $350. Additionally, a surcharge of $250 will be added to your annual driver’s license fee for each of the next three years. Added up, getting caught driving without insurance in Texas the first time will end up costing you between $925 and $1100.
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